2020 Civic History

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The clean, straightforward design of the 2020 Civic is let down only by the turbo model’s excessive add-ons.

The Civic is at its best with the turbocharged 1.5-liter engine. We like it because, in addition to being more powerful than the base 2.0-liter engine, it provides a significant boost in fuel economy and generally improves the driving experience. You can get it starting with the EX trim level. (READ: 2019 Honda Hrv Pictures Concept)

2020 Civic New Concept

Honestly, Honda could have sent its engineers on a yearlong vacation to Tahiti rather than task them with updating the 2020 Civic. We’ve been giving this generation Civic top marks since its debut three years ago, and there’s nothing else out this year that’s going to steal the car’s title belt. But here we are anyway with an even better Civic.

For starters, the 2020 Honda Civic gets a restyled front end. The new look is subtle and helps the car look a little sleeker and less imposing. Inside, you get an updated infotainment interface that brings with it the return of a volume knob for the Civic. This small addition addresses one of the biggest complaints we had with the Civic last year.

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2020 Civic Interior

What’s more, all Civic trims also get additional features from the Honda Sensing bundle, which is now standard. It includes adaptive cruise control, forward collision mitigation, and lane departure warning with lane keeping assist. The Civic already had several advantages over competitors, and this addition of safety equipment is yet another.

As always, there are a few notable competitors that you might want to also look at. These include the sporty Mazda 3, the weather-beating Subaru Impreza and the value-packed Kia Forte. But really, the 2019 Honda Civic is the one to beat. It has the most comprehensive combination of feature content, comfort and driving entertainment you’ll find in a small sedan today.

2020 Honda Civic configurations

The 2020 Honda Civic is a compact car currently offered as a sedan or a coupe. Depending on which body style you choose, there are different trim levels: LX, Sport, EX, EX-L (sedan only) and Touring. Honda has not yet released details on the hatchback body style or the high-performance Si and Type R models, but we fully expect them to return for the 2019 model year. This review will be updated when details are available.

Though it may be the base trim, the standard Civic LX sedan comes with a lot of equipment for the money. Standard equipment highlights include a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine (158 horsepower, 138 pound-feet of torque), a six-speed manual transmission (a CVT automatic is optional), 16-inch wheels (steel wheels for the sedan, alloys for the coupe), LED running lights, automatic climate control and a height-adjustable driver’s seat. Electronics features include a 5-inch central display screen, a rearview camera, Bluetooth, and a four-speaker sound system with a USB port. Also standard is the Honda Sensing safety package. It includes adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and keeping assist, road departure mitigation, automatic high beams, and forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking.

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The Sport comes with the LX equipment plus 18-inch alloy wheels, foglights, a center-outlet dual exhaust, aerodynamic bodywork, 60/40-split folding rear seatbacks, a rear center armrest with cupholders, sport pedals, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, dynamic guidelines for the rearview camera, keyless ignition and entry with remote start, a 7-inch touchscreen interface with HondaLink, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration, and an eight-speaker audio system with dual USB ports.

Stepping up to the EX gets you the turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine (174 hp, 162 lb-ft). Thanks to impressive acceleration and big fuel economy numbers (up to 36 mpg combined), the turbocharged four-cylinder is enough reason to buy an EX Civic or above. The EX also gets most of the Sport’s tech equipment (including the 7-inch touchscreen) and it adds the CVT as standard along with a sunroof, 17-inch alloy wheels, Honda’s LaneWatch blind-spot camera, heated side mirrors, dual-zone automatic climate control, heated front seats, a power-adjustable driver’s seat and satellite radio.

If you want a few more creature comforts, there’s the EX-L, which gets leather upholstery, a power-adjustable passenger seat and an auto-dimming rearview mirror. The Touring trim level essentially builds off the EX-L and adds 18-inch wheels, LED headlights, automatic wipers, paddle shifters, heated rear seats and a 10-speaker audio system. Also standard is an integrated navigation system.

Trim tested

Each vehicle typically comes in multiple versions that are fundamentally similar. The ratings in this review are based on our full test of the Honda Civic Touring Sedan (turbo 1.5L inline-4 | CVT automatic | FWD).

ALSO READ: Honda Civic 2020 Model Photos

NOTE: Since this test was conducted in 2016, the current Honda Civic has received some revisions, including the introduction of an optional 7-inch infotainment interface and adjustments to available features. Our findings remain broadly applicable to this year’s Honda Civic.

The best value in 2020 Civic is a base model with manual gearbox, but it’s still decently priced after adding fancy audio, leather, and a moonroof.

10 Photos of the 2020 Civic History

2020 Civic Performance2020 Civic Performance and New Engine2020 Civic Spesification2020 Civic Engine2020 Civic Interior2020 Civic Price and Review2020 Civic Exterior2020 Civic Ratings2020 Civic New Concept2020 Civic New Concept

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